How Little Bunny Rabbit Caught the Sun by Katie Phillips

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Screen Shot 2014-08-15 at 3.06.38 PM.png

How Little Bunny Rabbit Caught the Sun by Katie Phillips

40.00

This high quality art poster is 18x24" printed on heavy stock. Perfect for framing! Comes with the original story behind the illustration. These limited edition prints are all hand-numbered and signed by the artist. 

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The story behind "How Little Bunny Rabbit Caught The Sun" as told to me by my mother when I was about 5 or 6.

How Little Bunny Rabbit Caught The Sun

Little Bunny Rabbit lived on the edge of the woods. He had a cozy little home at the roots of a tall, strong tree. Grandmother Rabbit lived with Little Bunny Rabbit and kept house for him. Every morning Little Bunny Rabbit took his bow and arrows and hopped away into the woods to hunt. Every evening he came home with carrots, lettuce and skins. Grandmother Rabbit cooked some of the carrots for dinner and some she hid away. Winter days would come and then Little Bunny Rabbit would find no vegetables. She dried the skins and stored them away. They would make warm furs for the winter.

One night Little Bunny Rabbit came home with a big bagful of carrots and skins slung over his shoulder. But Little Bunny Rabbit was cross.

"Grandmother Rabbit," he said. "I get up early every morning to hunt in the woods. But someone always gets there ahead of me."
"How do you know that?" asked Grandmother Rabbit.
"I can see his tracks in the path," said Little Bunny Rabbit "He must have very long feet."
"Well," said Grandmother Rabbit. "You must get up earlier than that long-footed creature. That is the only thing to do."

So next morning Little Bunny Rabbit got up an hour earlier. He took his bow and arrows and hopped away into the woods to hunt. Just as soon as he got to the woods he saw the long tracks in the path again.

Little Bunny Rabbit was cross.

"I got out of my nice warm bed a whole hour earlier than usual," he said to himself, "and after all that long-footed creature has been here ahead of me. I wish I could find who he is and where he comes from."

He hunted all day and at night, when he came home he told Grandmother Rabbit how he had seen the long tracks again. "Well," said Grandmother Rabbit. "You must not let that long-footed creature get ahead of you again. You must get up still earlier."

So next morning Little Bunny Rabbit crept out of his nice warm bed an hour earlier. Grandmother Rabbit gave him a good breakfast of carrots and lettuce and he took his bow and arrows and hopped away to the woods.

"Surely I must be ahead of that long-footed creature this time," he said to himself.

But there were the long tracks in the path the same as ever.

Little Bunny Rabbit was very cross indeed.

"I got out of my nice warm bed a whole hour earlier all for nothing," he said. "How I wish I could find out who that long-footed creature is and where he comes from."

He hunted all day, and at night he went home and told Grandmother Rabbit that he had been too late again. The long-footed creature had been there ahead of him.

"You must get up earlier still," said Grandmother Rabbit. "But I cannot get up any earlier," said Little Bunny Rabbit. "Then you can never find out who makes those long tracks," said Grandmother Rabbit.

"I have an idea," cried Little Bunny Rabbit suddenly. "I will make a trap. Then I can catch the long-footed creature that makes the tracks."
"I wouldn't do that," said Grandmother Rabbit. "You might catch some very large animal."

But Little Bunny Rabbit did not listen to Grandmother Rabbit. He got out his hatchet and sharpened it well. Then he went into the woods and cut down some trees. He made a fine strong trap, and then he went home and went to bed.

In the morning he got up early and did not wait for any breakfast. He was afraid that Grandmother Rabbit would ask him if he had made a trap. He hopped off to the woods as fast as he could go to see if he had caught anything in his trap. As he hopped toward the trap he saw it was very, very light, as bright as noon. He could hardly look at the trap the light was so dazzling. It was very hot, too.

Little Bunny Rabbit had caught the sun in his trap! Little Bunny Rabbit was very much afraid. He turned around and hopped home as fast as ever he could go. He told Grandmother Rabbit that he had made a trap.

"And there is something in my trap," he cried. "It is very, very bright. It is as bright as fire. What is it, Grandmother Rabbit?"
"Oh, you naughty Little Bunny Rabbit," scolded Grandmother Rabbit "I told you not to make a trap. You have caught the sun in your trap."
"Oh, dear," cried Little Bunny Rabbit. "I did not mean to catch the sun. What will he do to us?"
"He will burn the world up," said Grandmother Rabbit, "if you don't go back and let him out at once."
"I would like to let him out," said Little Bunny Rabbit, "but I don't dare to go back near that trap. It is so very hot there."
"But you must," said Grandmother Rabbit.

So Little Bunny Rabbit took his hatchet and hopped back to the woods. As he hopped toward the trap, the sun called out, "You naughty Bunny Rabbit, come and let me out or I will burn you up."
"Oh, please, Sun, do not burn me. I did not mean to catch you in my trap. I will let you out as soon as I can," cried Little Bunny.

He hopped nearer and nearer the trap. How hot it was! He wanted to turn around and hop home, but the sun kept calling, "Let me out, let me out or I will burn you up."

At last Little Bunny Rabbit was close enough to the trap to open it with his hatchet. The sun jumped out and up into the sky. As the sun jumped, it touched Little Bunny Rabbit's tail and burned part of it off. And that is why rabbits always have such short tails.